3 mins

Inside our virtual event: Uncover Guyana

Looking to catch up on our Guyana virtual event? You’re in for a treat. We’ve got a recording of the webinar, the answers to your questions and some highlights from the evening here...

Inside our Guyana travel inspiration event (Shutterstock)

Our Uncover Guyana: Land of the Giants virtual event had over 300 people watching live, oohing and ahhing at the incredible photographs of Guyana’s landscapes and wildlife. 

Wanderlust’s own Lyn Hughes kicked things off by sharing some fond memories of Guyana from her 2019 trip, before handing over to Nicola Balram, Senior Officer of Marketing of the Guyana Tourism Authority, who shared her expertise on this bountiful country. Next up was Helen Bryon from Wildlife Worldwide, who filled us in on Guyana’s exciting wildlife and colourful birdlife, recommending exploring by river for ‘superb wildlife spotting’ that’s ‘a real assault on the senses’. Tony Thorne of Wilderness Explorers took centre stage to talk to us about community-led and owned tourism in Guyana, explaining how it benefits local communities and visitors.

Local tour guide Salvador de Caires followed, taking us on an enthusiastic journey through Guyana’s rich history – unsurprisingly, many attendees asked for his details, so they could book him as their guide on their own Guyanese adventure. Last but not least, Kamrul Baksh from the Guyana Tourism Authority shared photos and stories of Moraikobai, Karasabai and many other villages in Guyana. We also met Delven Adams, a well-known chef in Guyana who spoke to us from Georgetown, via video.

After the inspiring presentations were over, it was time for our experts to answer your questions, some of which have been listed below along with a full recording of the webinar…

Watch the full webinar

Your questions answered

When is the best time to visit Guyana?

You can visit Guyana any time of year. It depends on what you want do while you’re there. Late August to April is the dry season, when it is much easier to move around the country. 

How long do you recommend spending in Guyana? 

You need at least 10 days. Most travellers from the UK will spend 14 days to get a good overview of Guyana.

When is the best time to see Kaieteur Falls?

Kaieteur has its greatest flow during the wet season but whatever time you visit, you’re in for an incredible experience at Kaieteur Falls.

When does the rainy season start? And what is the average temperature?

The wet season is from mid-November to mid-January and then from May to July. That said, in December it's just short sharp rains, so many people do travel in December, especially to see the festivities. The rainy season has little impact on temperature and the average high is 28°C.

Is it easy to spot jaguars in Guyana?

There’s a very healthy population of jaguar in Guyana, especially in the Iwokrama Rainforest, but the dense infrastructure means they are hard to see. I would go in with the expectation that if you see them it would be the cherry on top. So, they’re there, but if you see one you’re lucky.

When is the best time to visit for birdwatching?

Generally, February to April and September to November. This is when we get migratory species, as well. Guyana has nearly 900 species of bird.

What vaccinations do you need to visit Guyana?

Be sure to check your immunisation status before you travel and seek current advice on the best antimalarials to take based on the parts of Guyana you will be visiting. It is also recommended that you stay up to date on tetanus, diphtheria and hepatitis A. Immunisations against hepatitis B may be needed for longer trips and for rabies if you are travelling in remote areas and working with animals. Proof of yellow fever status is required for entry into Guyana if you are travelling from a yellow fever endemic area, or if you are continuing onto Suriname.

What language is spoken in Guyana?

The main language is English, although there are other languages spoken such as several Amerindian dialects.

How easy is it to travel around the country independently?
Given Guyana is a relatively uncharted land covered in around 85% rainforest, it can be challenging to travel independently. Logistics can take a lot of planning and may require combining various modes of transportation such as planes, riverboats and 4X4s. Internal flights in Guyana are available however they are tricky to book independently and many flights for tourism purposes are chartered (so we would suggest using a local agent). It's also worth noting that there is one road that runs from Georgetown to Lethem and a bus service is available. The road quality can be poor and during the wet season, some sections may become flooded.  Some lodges can also help with transportation and pick ups (although this will have to be arranged in advance). 

What did you have to say? 

As always, the chat box was alive with thoughts and comments from the audience, so we thought we would share some of your comments here...

  • Kaieteur Falls looks amazing!

  • I'm loving Salvador's stories! History and culture are a big draw for me. 

  • I really enjoyed this, it was wonderful. Thanks so much to everyone.

  • What a beautiful country. Thanks for sharing with us!

  • Many thanks to everyone for this webinar. I absolutely loved it.

  • Thank you Lyn and all the great guest speakers for another really good Wanderlust webinar. 

  • I didn't know anything about Guyana before this event. What an amazing place. It's gone from nowhere to near the top of my to-go list!

  • I've really enjoyed this session, especially the humour and dynamics between the panellists. Thanks everyone!

  • Thank you so much for this. This has been superb and a great education.

  • What an awesome presentation. Many thanks to all the panelists for their excellent presentations. The interaction between you all was inspiring.

A little look inside the evening…

Lyn Hughes kicked off the evening by telling us about how much she loved her time in Guyana, especially the incredible Kaieteur Falls.

Lyn Hughes kicked off the evening by telling us about how much she loved her time in Guyana, especially the incredible Kaieteur Falls.

Nicola took us through some of her highlights of Guyana, saying the nature is a particular draw for her.

Nicola took us through some of her highlights of Guyana, saying the nature is a particular draw for her.

Helen also mentioned Kaieteur Falls in her presentation – admitting it's in a league of its own.

Helen also mentioned Kaieteur Falls in her presentation – admitting it's in a league of its own.

Helen filled us in on the exciting wildlife that can be spotted in Guyana.

Helen filled us in on the exciting wildlife that can be spotted in Guyana.

Helen shared her advice on spotting the Guianan cock-of-the-rock.

Helen shared her advice on spotting the Guianan cock-of-the-rock.

Tony Thorne told us how community-led tourism is helping many local communities in Guyana.

Tony Thorne told us how community-led tourism is helping many local communities in Guyana.

Kamrul gave us an insight into some of Guyana's villages.

Kamrul gave us an insight into some of Guyana's villages.

Salvador gave us a great insight into Guyana's rich culture and history.

Salvador gave us a great insight into Guyana's rich culture and history.

The evening ended with all of our experts answering your questions about travelling in Guyana.

The evening ended with all of our experts answering your questions about travelling in Guyana.

Don't miss our future events! See what's on here

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