The Big Wombat (Scotdesco Aboriginal Community)
Blog Words : Weird@Wanderlust | 05 June

Australia's lesser-known 'Big Things'

You've heard of the Big Banana and the Big Pineapple, but what about the Big Mower? Here are 12 big things in Australia that aren't on the tourist map – yet

Big Mushroom (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)
Big Mushroom (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)

1. The Big Mushroom, Belconnen, ACT

Located in the Belconnen Fresh Food Markets, the Giant Mushroom shelters a children's playground. Supported by the Australian Cancer Society, this six metre high mushroom provides relief from the harsh Aussie sun.

Giant Ant (Creative Commons: Bilby)
Giant Ant (Creative Commons: Bilby)

2. The Big Ant, Broken Hill, NSW

This striking sculpture of a bull ant was designed by artist Pro Hart and originally stood outside the Stephens Creek Hotel. It was built in 1980 but in 1990 it was donated to the city and moved to the Tourist Information Centre in Broken Hill.

Big Mossie (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)

Big Mossie (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)

3. The Big Mosquito, Hexham, NSW

'Ossie the Mossie' at the Hexham Bowls Club is not only big, but anatomically correct. He is modelled on a local mosquito species, Ochlerotatus alternans, also known as 'Hexham Greys'. His eyes are illuminated every night...

Big Bowling Ball (Creative Commons: Photnaut)
Big Bowling Ball (Creative Commons: Photnaut)

4. The Big Bowling Ball, Lake Cathie, NSW

This 10ft replica of a lawn bowl is a 1.5 tonne steel and concrete tribute to one of Australia's most popular hobbies. Drive down Evans Street and you can't miss it.

Big Bolt and Nut (Creative Commons: Fishieman15)
Big Bolt and Nut (Creative Commons: Fishieman15)

5. The Big Bolt and Nut, Roma, Queensland

Located in front of 'Banks Bolts and Fasteners' at 177–183 Raglan Street, this striking sculpture would set Banks apart from all the other Bolt and Fastener shops in Roma. If there were any.

Big Mower (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)
Big Mower (Creative Commons: Stuart Edwards)

6. The Big Mower, Beerwah, Queensland

Sure, the mower it was modelled on is no longer available, but this huge grasscutter certainly catches the eye. Not that the mower shop it advertises makes a big deal of the 11-metre monster on its roof. There is not a single mention of it on the shop's website.

Big Dice (Creative Commons: Funnyface6)
Big Dice (Creative Commons: Funnyface6)

7. The Big Dice, Barrier Highway, South Australia

The Big Dice consist of six concrete blocks piled into a small pyramid, just off the Barrier Highway between Yunta and Mannahill. Be warned, your luck is sure to run out if you try to roll them.

The Big Wombat (Scotdesco Aboriginal Community)
The Big Wombat (Scotdesco Aboriginal Community)

8. The Big Wombat, Bookabie, South Australia

Situated on the Scotdesco Aboriginal Community (Tjilkaba) on Highway 1, the Big Wombat was a real community project with everyone getting involved in its construction.

The Big Wickets (Creative Commons: BrisbanePom)
The Big Wickets (Creative Commons: BrisbanePom)

9. The Big Wickets, Westbury, Tasmania

Located at the front of the local cricket pitch, these huge wickets commemorate the career of locally born cricketer, Jack Badcock. Jack played test cricket for Australia between 1936 and 1938 – the first Tasmanian player to do so.

The Big Dead Fish (Creative Commons: Bilby)
The Big Dead Fish (Creative Commons: Bilby)

10. The Big Dead Fish, Fish Creek, Victoria

The Fish Creek Hotel is an imposing Art Deco building – topped with a giant dead fish. 

The 20ft mullet was created by Venus Bay artist Colin Suggett as part of an art installation. Legend has it that Rob Moncur, the owner of the Fish Creek Hotel, took a fancy to it and bought it. The rest, as they say, is fishtory.

Big Blue-Tongued Lizard (Creative Commons: Stoowiki)

Big Blue-Tongued Lizard (Creative Commons: Stoowiki)

11. Big Blue-Tongued Lizard, Kalamunda,Western Australia

A touching tribute to a blue-tongued lizard that lived on the block of land, this 9-metre replica, carved out of rammed earth by Roman Antoniuk, is testament to the love that only a lizard can inspire.