Restricted area sign (Shutterstock.com. See main credit below)
Blog Words : Weird@Wanderlust | 29 January

4 amazing places you'll need a permit to visit

Difficult to reach and hard to get into, these amazing spots need special permits to visit. Here's why they're worth the effort

Coast near Nhulunbuy (Shutterstock.com) Coast near Nhulunbuy (Shutterstock.com)

1. Arnhem Land, Australia

Bordered by Kakadu National Park, the Arafura Sea and the Gulf of Carpentaria, this corner of wilderness in Australia’s Northern Territory is owned by the Yolngu people who have lived here for over 60,000 years. Indigenous culture is still strong here and the  famous Injalak Art and Craft Centre is an important custodian of Aborignal art.

Why you’ll want to go

It’s a vast unspoiled wilderness, rich in Aboriginal culture. Arnhem Land is where didgeridoos originated from and it is an important conservation habitat for dugongs, nesting turtles and migratory birds. It’s also one of the best fishing destinations in the world.

How to get a permit

Aboriginal land in Australia is privately owned. It is not Crown land, nor public land. To visit Arnhem Land you will need a permit from the Northern Land Council.

More information

Dalton Highway (Shutterstock.com)Dalton Highway (Shutterstock.com)

2. Prudhoe Bay, Alaska

As the northernmost terminus of the Dalton Highway, Prudhoe Bay is literally the end of the road ­– the furthest north you can drive in the USA.  The town itself is nothing special. Just pre-fab huts built on tundra bog, but the 414-mile drive along the ‘Haul Road’ to get there is something special.

Why you’ll want to go

The Dalton Highway is little more than a gravel road, but it takes you through some of the most pristine wilderness in Alaska.  You’ll cross both the mighty Yukon River and the Arctic Circle and cross the rugged Atigun Pass in the Brooks Range and into the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge.

How to get a permit

Access to Prudhoe Bay and the Arctic Ocean is restricted to oil field workers and tour groups with special permits. A number of tour agencies out of Fairbanks, Anchorage and Deadhorse offer excursions to the Arctic Ocean and the Prudhoe Bay oil facility. 

More information

Big Almaty Lake (Shutterstock.com)
Big Almaty Lake (Shutterstock.com)
 

3.  Big Almaty Lake, Kazakhstan

Tucked within the Alatau-Eliy National park, and backed by spectacular mountains, this picture-perfect lake is famous for changing colours with each season.

Why you’ll want to go

One of Kazakhstan’s most treasured beauty spots, Big Almaty Lake offers something for nature lovers, trekkers and photographers alike. There is also an astronomical observatory nearby that is worth checking out.

How to get a permit

As of July 2015 the areas around Big Almaty Lake and Chimbulak are restricted and permission is needed to visit. The decree was recently revised to allow visits to the Lake but the situation remains uncertain. Check with authorities in Almaty before setting off for the lake.

More information

Havelock Island (Shutterstock.com)Havelock Island (Shutterstock.com)

4. Andaman and Nicobar Islands, India

1,400km from mainland India and 1,000km from Thailand, the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are tantalisingly remote. Venture here, and you'll find a truly unspoilt wilderness – think primeval jungle, sugar-white beaches, and adventures without another soul in sight.

Why you’ll want to go

Legendary beaches, world-class diving and the unmistakable feeling that you have well and truly got away from it all.

How to get a permit

Foreign nationals require permit (RAP - Restricted Area Permit) to visit the Andaman Nicobar Islands, which is easily available on arrival at Port Blair by flight or ship from the Immigration Authorities for 30 days. This is extendable for another 15 days with permission from the Superintendent of Police, Andaman District-Port Blair.

More information

 

Main image: Restricted area sign (Shutterstock.com)