Ice hotel, Sweden (Dreamstime)
List 27 October

White nights: Five chilly sleeps worth staying awake for

Camp out in the South Pole, build your own igloo in Finland, or watch the northern lights from the comfort of your bed! These cool accommodation options will make your wintry holiday all the more magical

1: Snooze in an ice cave, Svalbard

Ice caves of the high arctic at Svalbard (Shutterstock)

Ice caves of the high arctic at Svalbard (Shutterstock)

On a two-day trip with Svalbard Wildlife Expeditions (Nov–May) to Lars Glacier on Spitsbergen, you’ll sleep in a caves (with a mat and sleeping bag) beneath a starry ceiling of ice crystals.

2: See the Aurora from your bed, Iceland

Icelandic northern lights in autumn time (Shutterstock)

Icelandic northern lights in autumn time (Shutterstock)

Spend a winter’s night in a glass bubble in Iceland’s 5 Million Star Hotel (Sept–Mar) and watch the northern lights dance across the sky from your bed.

3: Snuggle up at the ice hotel, Sweden

A room in the ice hotel, Sweden (Dreamstime)

A room in the ice hotel, Sweden (Dreamstime)

The first ice hotel opened in Jukkasjarvi in 1989, and was rebuilt every winter. Now, a permanent addition sees part of it open year-round, so you can sleep on ice in any season.

4: Stay in your own igloo, Finland

Snow igloo village, Finland (Shutterstock)

Snow igloo village, Finland (Shutterstock)

Traditional Lappish igloos don’t use ice but snow instead, and it’s an easy skill to learn. On an overnight igloo-building stay in Rovaniemi ( Dec–Apr), you’ll spend about six hours building a shelter in prime aurora-viewing territory.

5: Sleep at the South Pole, Antarctica

Campsite at Union Glacier in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica (Shutterstock)

Campsite at Union Glacier in the Ellsworth Mountains, Antarctica (Shutterstock)

On a trip to Union Glacier, you can spend a night at 90º South. You’ll fly to the ice runway at South Pole Station, from which it’s a 1km walk across 3,000m-thick ice to a seasonal camp (Jan only) at the bottom of the world. The cost of this six-day adventure? A cool £42,000.