A roaring lion (Susan McConnell)
List 24 January

Join the uproar: 4 ways you can help to save lions

Lions are in crisis. Half of them have been lost over the past 25 years, and there are fewer lions than rhinos on the African continent. The Lion Recovery Fund reveals how you can help

1: Travel to Africa’s wildlife areas

A lion in the Masai Mara (Jon McCormack)

A lion in the Masai Mara (Jon McCormack)

Dreaming of an African safari adventure? There’s no better way to feed your passion for lions and other wildlife than to see them in the wild. Visiting Africa’s parks and reserves generates employment and financial benefits for African countries and help strengthen the political will for conservation of wilderness and wildlife, such as lions. Without those economic incentives, many governments might be forced to find other uses for the same lands. 

The vast majority of visitors to Africa visit a handful of parks and reserves in just a few countries. Visiting countries and reserves off the beaten track can help spread the benefits that accrue from tourism and help more people value lions and other wildlife. 

2: Leave lions (and their parts) alive

A male lion (Susan McConnell)

A male lion (Susan McConnell)

This doubtlessly goes without saying to Wanderlust readers, but do not ever purchase any souvenirs, trinkets, or other products made from wildlife parts.

The illegal wildlife trade is one of the top five international crimes; it’s linked to other criminal offences like trafficking guns and people, and decimates wildlife and the natural bank accounts of many African nations. Targeted poaching of lions for their skins, claws, bones, and teeth is an increasing threat. Keep furs and fangs, corals and claws where they belong – on the animals who own them.

3: Join the uproar

Lionesses fighting (Ken and Michelle Dyball)

Lionesses fighting (Ken and Michelle Dyball)

The crisis that lions are facing is, unfortunately, a quiet one. Many people around the world do not know it’s even happening. You can help to spread the word. Talk about the issue with your friends and family. Use social media to share the message that lions need help, and protecting them protects people and nature in Africa for the future. Join the uproar! You can start by following the Lion Recovery Fund on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

4: Donate

A lioness resting in a tree (Jon McCormack)

A lioness resting in a tree (Jon McCormack)

Dedicated conservationists are risking their lives each day across Africa to protect lions and help people live with this top predator. What they, and lions, need is your financial support – no matter how big or small. Donations can support ranger patrols to safeguard parks and remove deadly snare traps from lion ranges, and build 'lion-proof' livestock corrals that keep cattle, goats, and sheep safe at night from hungry lions (and therefore stop herders from hating big cats). These strategies all take resources, and your donation can be an integral part of bringing lions back from the brink.

Don’t know which organisations to support?  The Lion Recovery Fund (LRF) undertakes strenuous due diligence to find the best lion conservation projects needing support, regardless of the size of the organisation leading them. The LRF sends 100% of your donation directly to these projects without overhead or administrative fees to make the maximum impact with your support for lions. Alternatively, you could also donate directly to specific organisations working hard to conserve Africa’s lions. 

The Lion Recovery Fund (LRF) was created by the Wildlife Conservation Network and the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation to help the recovery of lions across Africa, while creating a philanthropic and conservation movement to restore their vast landscapes. For more information visit lionrecoveryfund.org