Stunning view of Ben Lomond, Scotland (Dreamstime)
List Words : Richard Franks | 07 April 2019

7 of the best walks in Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park

Offering dramatic views from almost anywhere in its 720 square miles of outstanding natural beauty, Loch Lomond & The Trossachs National Park is a walker’s paradise. Time to dust off your walking boots..

1. Ben Lomond: Scotland’s Southernmost Munro

The view from the west side of Ben Lomond, looking towards Ben Vorlich and Loch Sloy (Dreamstime)

The view from the west side of Ben Lomond, looking towards Ben Vorlich and Loch Sloy (Dreamstime)

It’s no surprise that Ben Lomond is only bettered by Ben Nevis when it comes to Scottish munro ascension. Popular with first time munro-baggers, Ben Lomond’s ascent along the ‘tourist trail’ is relatively straightforward thanks to its gentle climb and undemanding terrain.

Those looking for a more challenging descent should tackle the rockier Ptarmigan ridge which heads down the west of the munro.

Views from the pinnacle offer unbeatable vistas of the Loch and its islands, while on a clear day the Inner Hebrides can also be seen to the west.

Top tip: Ben Lomond is easily accessible from Rowardennan car park.

 

2. Conic Hill: Best Quick Hike

Conic Hill, an easier walk with excellent views of Loch Lomond (Dreamstime)

Conic Hill, an easier walk with excellent views of Loch Lomond (Dreamstime)

Perfect for those short on time or with children in tow, Conic Hill is a leisurely hike which rewards walkers with superb views across Loch Lomond on its 45-minute ascent.

If you’re even shorter on time, the views begin to unfold from around a third of the way up. Birdwatchers should also keep an eye out for buzzards and hen harriers patrolling the skies.

Top tip: Just across from Conic Hill car park is the Oak Tree Inn – an blissful lakeside pub perfect for that well-deserved refuel.

 

3. Callander Crags: Short, But Strenuous

The bridge of the very charming village Callander, in Scotland (Dreamstime)

The bridge of the very charming village Callander, in Scotland (Dreamstime)

The Callander Crags trail is a mixed walk which combines woodland with high crags above the village of Callander. Weaving through trees at the back of the town, the trail begins with a steep ascent through conifer woodlands before meeting the rugged crags.

This walk is strenuous but highly rewarding, with the ascent encompassing rocky terrain, muddy slopes and uneven steps on a two hour round trip. The summit, at 343 metres, offers panoramic views across Callander and the Trossachs.

Top tip: Many people combine this walk with a trip to the idyllic Bracklinn Falls, just a short stroll from Callander Crags starting point.

 

4. Inversnaid RSPB Nature Trail: Best Nature Walk

A stunning view of Arrochar Alps and Loch Lomond, Scotland (Shutterstock)

A stunning view of Arrochar Alps and Loch Lomond, Scotland (Shutterstock)

Beginning in Inversnaid, this trail heads north on the West Highland Way through the Inversnaid RSPB Nature Reserve.

In spring and summer, look out for black grouse, redstart and pied flycatcher amongst other bird species that frequent the stunning reserve. Walkers will also be able to admire the various types of tree, including oakwood and birch, covering the land from the hills above down to the loch shores.

The easy walk, taking around an hour and a half, heads uphill in the direction of the Arrochar Alps before descending through the woods to the northernmost point of the trail. The peaceful return route runs along the shore.

 

5. Glen Ogle Trail: Best Historic Route

The famous Glen Ogle viaduct, Scotland (Shutterstock)

The famous Glen Ogle viaduct, Scotland (Shutterstock)

This unusual four-hour walk takes in the historic Glen Ogle viaduct, heading across lofty disused railway tracks and an old military road.

While this walk is family-friendly, there are steep sections which make the walk more moderate than easy. The route takes in the former Callander and Oban railway line, which closed in 1965 and offers superb views across Loch Earn. Be warned that the return route can often be boggy following poor weather as the paths are not as distinct.

Top tip: Visit the former Lochearnhead station, now a Scouts activity centre, which is signposted during the trail.

 

6. Ben More: A Challenging Climb

Ben More, the tallest of Loch Lomond's many munros, is best battled by experienced hikers (Shutterstock)

Ben More, the tallest of Loch Lomond's many munros, is best battled by experienced hikers (Shutterstock)

Ben More, standing proud at 1,174 metres, is the tallest of Loch Lomond’s 21 munros and offers a more challenging ascent than that of its popular counterpart, Ben Lomond.

Experienced hikers need around seven to eight hours for this round trip in the summer, as terrain is extremely rocky underfoot. Parts of the hike have no obvious path, meaning the route requires both agility and your full attention. Those persevering are rewarded with fantastic views across the Trossachs and the southern Highlands.

Keep a keen eye for mountain deer, red hare and upland birds like the golden eagle and skylark, all of which are regularly spotted on the munro.

 

7. Rob Roy Way: A Seven-Day Ramble

Along the Rob Roy walking trail, north of Drymen in Stirlingshire, Scotland (Shutterstock)

Along the Rob Roy walking trail, north of Drymen in Stirlingshire, Scotland (Shutterstock)

The Rob Roy Way is a long distance walk that runs between the south west Loch Lomond village of Drymen to the north east burgh of Pitlochry, at the foot of the Cairngorms. This walk takes in either 77 or 94 miles of stunning Scottish countryside, dependent on the route taken along Loch Tay, with Ben Lawers, Ben Ledi and several Lochs passed by.

This route is aimed at experienced walkers. While seven days is the average completion rate, you should break up the route with overnight stays according to your fitness levels.

 

More Scottish gems to explore:

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